The Most Frequently Asked Questions I Get At The Office

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Question: I have gum recession.  Am I brushing my teeth too hard?

Answer:  No.  Gum recession is a result of several factors.  One major factor is the way your teeth meet together.  Certain teeth will take more of the biting load than others, and that can cause your gums around these teeth to recede.  Many times orthodontics will correct these biting issues. Other factors include gum health and genetic makeup.

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Question:  Do whitening toothpastes work?
Answer:   Maybe.  Some toothpastes and whitening strips have the same bleaching agents used in dental offices but at a lower dosage.  Only dentists are allowed by law to bleach teeth with higher doses of the bleaching agent used.  So your results will be better at a dentist’s office.  

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Question:   My tooth hurt after my dentist put a filling in it. Why?

Answer:    There are a few reasons why this can happen.  If the cavity was very deep and close to the nerve in the tooth, the nerve can become hypersensitive until it starts the healing process.  This can cause pain upon chewing or by ingesting cold foods or drinks.   In this case, usually giving the tooth time to heal will lead to diminished tooth discomfort.    Sometimes the cavity is so close to the nerve (or in the nerve) the tooth will actually die.  This will sometimes cause severe pain to chewing and temperatures.   In this case the tooth will need a root canal, which removes the nerve in the tooth.   And finally, sometimes a dentist may place a tooth colored filling in a tooth that has not sealed the tooth properly, so the filling can cause the discomfort when you chew.  Redoing the filling usually relieves the discomfort.

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Question:  Does having a root canal mean the dentist takes out the root?
Answer:   No.  A root canal removes the dying nerve and blood vessels that are inside of each tooth.  The entire tooth, root and all, stays in your mouth.  After removing the blood vessels and nerves, the dentist puts in a material that seals the tooth so the body can heal around it.  Usually a cap or crown is put on the tooth after root canal to protect it.

 

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Question:  What is the difference between a cap and a crown?
Answer:  None.  They are the same thing.


Schedule an appointment at Emerson Dental Arts in Emerson, NJ, by phone or online to get effective control and treatment for a healthier smile. 

Author
Archer Katz

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